A Psychotherapeutic Approach to Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Part 3

So how do we control stress? First of all, the perception of control is vital. Those people who possess an external locus of controlĀ  (that is, we feel powerless when confronted by stress) tend to suffer the most. We generally deal with stress in one of three ways: We fight it head-on, we attempt to reduce its impact or we run away from it. Clients suffering from depression often have an exaggerated external locus of control, in addition to other unhelpful “attribution styles.”

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A Psychotherapeutic Approach to Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Part 2

The very nature of M.E., with its physical and emotional peaks and troughs, leads to heightened awareness. Regular fatigue may be subconsciously intensified to a point where we fear a relapse is inevitable. So called “good days” may result in boredom and frustration, “bad days” in depression and anxiety. We may feel that we are “paying the price” when “normal” behaviour (a walk in the park, an evening out with friends) results in exhaustion and a reoccurrence of symptoms. Continue reading “A Psychotherapeutic Approach to Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Part 2”

Exercise Testing After Bypass Post 2

Unlike an appendectomy, which cures appendicitis, bypass surgery doesn’t eliminate your risk for angina or heart attack. In fact, people who have had bypass surgery are at increased risk for serious heart problems compared with the rest of the population because they still have the underlying disease, atherosclerosis. This disease caused the initial coronary artery blockages and can cause later blockage, either in the patient’s original arteries or in the bypass grafts. Continue reading “Exercise Testing After Bypass Post 2”